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Headcanon: Erwin Is an Expert At Forging Signatures

snk-headcanons:

Handwriting forgery was a skill he developed from a young age. First by learning to mimic his father’s handwriting; then, those of his classmates’.

As Erwin grew older, he quickly realised the practical use of such a skill in the political arena and polished it to the point where he can now forge most writing styles and signatures of all the highest ranking government officials.

Erwin doesn’t limit himself to only the penmanship of the aristocracy though. A man must practice to keep his skills sharp, and Erwin Smith is nothing if not a pragmatist.

Suffice to say, Erwin considers all his peers and subordinates to be fair game and quite often takes the liberty of responding to missives addressed to a recipient as the recipient. With or without the intended recipient’s knowledge or consent (usually without). 

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 20 notes
Tagged as: #pfft #yesyesyes 
fuck-benedict-cumberbatch:

oeve-at-221b:

my-stereo-heart-beats-for-you:

albus—tumbledore:

32, 613 people understand this. Please explain


What?

nobody say a word

fuck-benedict-cumberbatch:

oeve-at-221b:

my-stereo-heart-beats-for-you:

albus—tumbledore:

32, 613 people understand this. Please explain

What?

nobody say a word

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 90,665 notes
fish-boned:

shickalenia:

dduane:

thesuitsofwoah:

that’s almost too cruelalmost

I had to do this once with Privateer II: The Darkening. It gained a bit when he said “I bet you didn’t play it through, I bet somebody just told you how…” and I was able to smile gently and say “God, possibly, since I wrote the game.” And plainly the Deity was with me that day, as I happened to be carrying docs from my UK agent (who’d done the deal) that showed not only that I was the writer, but the five-figure sum I had been paid. …It was a happy day for me. Not so much for him. I’d never had a referent for the word “slink” for a full grown male before. As in “slink away in utter dejection.” I smiled for at least three days without stopping. And am smiling now… I had completely forgotten about this.

Reblogging because “I beat the game” is fantastic, but “I wrote the damn thing” is even better.

I’m not a gamer but I’ll always reblog these.

fish-boned:

shickalenia:

dduane:

thesuitsofwoah:

that’s almost too cruel
almost

I had to do this once with Privateer II: The Darkening. It gained a bit when he said “I bet you didn’t play it through, I bet somebody just told you how…” and I was able to smile gently and say “God, possibly, since I wrote the game.” And plainly the Deity was with me that day, as I happened to be carrying docs from my UK agent (who’d done the deal) that showed not only that I was the writer, but the five-figure sum I had been paid. …It was a happy day for me. Not so much for him. I’d never had a referent for the word “slink” for a full grown male before. As in “slink away in utter dejection.” I smiled for at least three days without stopping. And am smiling now… I had completely forgotten about this.

Reblogging because “I beat the game” is fantastic, but “I wrote the damn thing” is even better.

I’m not a gamer but I’ll always reblog these.

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 242,025 notes
thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 53,174 notes
Tagged as: #mentruation 

durnesque-esque:

misandry-mermaid:

thedragonflywarrior:

The head-turning Game of Thrones actress Gwendoline Christie is a towering 6ft 3in tall and admits she often felt she couldn’t relate to women on the big screen because of her Amazonian frame, but is now relishing the opportunity to play a tough, fierce warrior in the medieval fantasy drama.

She said: “It’s really vitally important to me the way women are portrayed. As someone who has always felt at times pretty genderless because of my size, it interests me to challenge ideas of prejudice and femininity, and what it is to be a woman.”

The towering actress reveals that she had numerous setbacks in her career before landing a prized role as Brienne of Tarth in the hit show, adding: “I found it so frustrating, particularly at the beginning, because I would be told, ‘Sorry love, you’re too tall.’ At one stage I was like, ‘I’ll give this another six months and if this persists, ‘I’ll become a nun.’ “

For her role as warrior Brienne, Gwendoline trained how to fight with swords and ride horses and says it’s “empowering” to know she can “break a man’s nose with my elbow.”

"I do all my own stunts and come away with bruises and scratches. After one scene I was absolutely covered in bruises all down one leg and up one arm. But it’s worth it. It’s quite fun. I enjoy knocking around with the boys."

I cannot get enough of this woman. She deserves all the awards.

<3_<3

After Game of Thrones, I want her to play Keladry from Tamora Pierce’s book series: Protector of the Small.

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 42,182 notes

strangeasanjles:

hisblackdress:

Links to all OOTD items can be found over on my blog, HisBlackDress.com.

I saw this nautical dress over on Modcloth last week, and knew I just had to have it.. I’m really crushing on a-line dresses, and I absolutely love blue and beige together, I decided to keep this outfit simple and just let the dress shine, and felt inspired to try a new locale for the photoshoot. I’m feeling super cute and really loving how this set turned out. What do you think, Tumblr?

Um, excuse me, your legs look fabulous and that dress is adorable.

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 4,544 notes

justyouraveragehaggis:

mooglemisbehaving:

jackthevulture:

Tell me these movies are just dumb comedies.  Tell me Po is just a stupid Panda.  Tell me.  I will fight you.

Kung Fu Panda is about a character with legitimate low self esteem issues who is mocked and ridiculed by the people he looks up to.  No matter how hard he trains, he doesn’t believe in himself until he discoverers that there is no “secret ingredient” that will make him great, because HE is what makes himself great. 

Po: There is no secret ingredient. It’s just you.

Oh my everlasting Primus, THIS.

This scene right here hit me like a punch to the gut. I thought I was gonna start crying in the theater, because that was ME up there. Someone, whoever wrote those lines, understood what it felt like. To go through life fat and clumsy, a walking punchline. To not know what pretty or strong or popular or good at something even feels like, and what other conclusion can you come to but that you are worthless?

Until… Shifu gets his head out of his ass, turns his thinking around, and starts training Po in ways that are useful to Po. Until Po finally gets the chance to apply the passion he’s always had and the kung-fu-nerdery he’s been amassing since he was little. Until Po becomes a master in his own time, in his own way, and saves the world without having to lose a single ounce to do it.

That was the second punch to the gut for me. Po doesn’t slim down and become buff. He still gets out of breath climbing stairs. He’s a giant awkward nerdapalooza and he’s pretty much always hungry. He’s still the same fat kid he always was, and the change, the miracle, is that that’s okay. He doesn’t have to not be a fat kid in order to be worthy.

I don’t know why Kung Fu Panda doesn’t get more love than it does. It should be our banner, y’all.

Kung Fu Panda was one of the first movies I EVER saw where the main character was fat and clumsy and awkward, basically a giant dork, but those things weren’t changed or gotten rid of during his hero quest. No one took him seriously because of them—not even himself—but it turns out that all the things about himself he was always embarrassed about did more to make him a hero and an essentially good person than training with the most skilled practitioners of martial arts in the country ever did. Normally, the fat or awkward or dorky protagonists turn out completely different by the end, at least in appearances if not personality.

When KFP came out I was still very insecure about my weight and my personality. I’ve been chubby, awkward and nerdy since my childhood, and I’d tried everything to fit in with other people—from karate classes and straightening my hair to desperately vying for popularity. But from the start of this movie, I LOVED Po, and I identified more with him than I have with any other character. And watching this scene, and all the other scenes afterwards, watching Po and everyone around him realize that he was strong and brave and good exactly the way he was, I realized the same about myself. That’s an important lesson for EVERYONE, regardless of age.

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 9,709 notes
4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 49,412 notes

knittingcountess:

acalmstrength2013:

Have you guys checked out Botanical Knits 2 by Alana Dakos yet?  It’s full of so many pretty patterns!  Pictured above:

Verdure fingerless mitts

Twigs and Willows mitts

Sunlit Autumn sweater

Ivy Trellis hat

Flourish sweater

Forest Foliage wrap

Sprig Sweater

Ferns hat

Hanging Leaves wrap

Aren’t they all lovely?  There are a few more (equally beautiful) patterns in the collection as well.

I have not yet, but I certainly plan to do so!

4 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 683 notes

gcnjustin:

image

The first time I heard of “homosexuals,” I was completely confused.

I was a sheltered Christian kid and I’d never heard the term, so I asked a more worldly friend about it.

As my friend explained it, homosexuals were men who put their you-know-what in another man’s…

5 hours ago on April 23rd | J | 501 notes